Innovative Collaboration with MSA

Developing a Preliminary Specification for Solenoids and Electromagnetic Devices

Developing a Preliminary Specification for Solenoids and Electromagnetic Devices When System Design Engineers are tasked with incorporating an electromagnetic device (i.e. a solenoid, electromagnet, voice coil, etc.) into a new product, it would be useful if they could readily access design “guidelines” that would help them to identify, quantify and then communicate the performance

Part Two: High Security, Robust Locking Applications, Ball-Detent Locking Solenoids (Patent Application No. 14592511)

HIGH SECURITY, ROBUST LOCKING APPLICATIONS, BALL-DETENT LOCKING SOLENOIDS: PART TWO Edited by David Stockwell; Technical information provided by Roland Mueller & Simon Benik BLOG 1 of this two-part series discussed the need for, and desired characteristics of a robust locking device, capable of providing a high hold force in a small package. It then went

Part One: High Security, Robust Locking Applications, Ball-Detent Locking Solenoids (Patent Application No. 14592511)

HIGH SECURITY, ROBUST LOCKING APPLICATIONS, BALL-DETENT LOCKING SOLENOIDS: PART ONE Edited by David Stockwell; Technical information provided by Roland Mueller & Simon Benik The need often arises to find a device that can securely lock the door to a room, the door or drawers of a cabinet, or even to securely hold independent sections

Power Control Modules for Electronic Actuators Series, Part Two: Fundamentals of Pulse Width Modulation, Including Effects of DUTY CYCLE and INDUCTANCE Relating to On-Off Electromagnetic Devices

POWER CONTROL MODULES FOR ELECTROMAGNETIC ACTUATORS: PART TWO Edited by David Stockwell; Technical information provided by Roland Mueller & Simon Benik Fundamentals of Pulse Width Modulation, including effects of DUTY CYCLE and INDUCTANCE relating to On-Off Electromagnetic Devices. Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) is a fully electronic power control circuit which, when applied to electromagnetic

Power Control Modules for Electronic Actuators Series, Part Three: Fundamentals of Pulse Width Modulation

POWER CONTROL MODULES FOR ELECRONIC ACTUATORS SERIES, PART THREE Edited by David Stockwell; Technical information provided by Roland Mueller & Simon Benik Fundamentals of Pulse Width Modulation Exploring the effects of INDUCTANCE, FREQUENCY AND INPUT CURRENT RIPPLE relating to On-Off Electromagnetic Devices. Pulse Width Modulation, Theory of Operation, Effects of INDUCTANCE, FREQUENCY & INPUT

Power Control Modules for Electronic Actuators Series, Part One: Basics of Solenoid Operation Demonstrating the Need for Improved Power Control

POWER CONTROL MODULES FOR ELECTROMAGNETIC ACTUATORS: PART ONE Edited by David Stockwell; Technical information provided by Roland Mueller & Simon Benik Magnet-Schultz of America (MSA) discuses how to achieve smaller, higher performing, more energy efficient solenoids, and avoid heat issues by utilizing electronic power control techniques, such as Pulse Width Modulation (PWM). Driving electromagnetic actuators

Linear Motor Series, Part Two: Design & Manufacturing Techniques

LINEAR MOTOR SERIES: PART TWO Magnet-Schultz of America (MSA) reveals the design and manufacturing techniques, performance, and functional characteristics of a Linear Motor. Edited by David Stockwell; Technical information provided by Dr. Jonathan Gamble & Kevin Code DESIGN & MANUFACTURING TECHNIQUES 1. External Appearance: The Linear Motor (LM) assembly looks just like a conventional

Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) Basics

Magnet-Schultz of America (MSA) decodes FMEA—identifying the most common types, answering frequently asked questions, defining the process and sharing the benefits. Exactly what is an FMEA, and why is it necessary to invest the time in developing one? FMEA is the abbreviation for: Failure Modes and Effects Analysis As the name suggests, an FMEA

Extreme Environment Solenoids: The DURO-TECH® Story

Often, prospective solenoid users innocently expect standard solenoids to perform a function for which they were never intended. For example, Magnet Schultz of America (MSA) received a request for a solenoid to lock the steering mechanism on a military vehicle. The customer had tested one of our standard solenoids, which they secured from a